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1. Messianic Judaism Disregards The Authority Of The Sages.

Rabbi Mordechai Rhine published an article last week on parashas Shemini focusing on Nadav and Avihu. About their death he asked, “How could it be that these two great sons of Ahron would err in such a significant way as to deserve the divine punishment of death on this auspicious day?” He answers by citing a story from the Talmud:

Moshe and Ahron were going in the lead, Nadav and Avihu were behind them, and the rest of the Jewish people followed. Nadav and Avihu said, ‘When will these elders die so that we can be the leaders.

Rabbi Rhine reminds us that these two sons of Aharon were holy men who had difficulty controlling their own drives and submitting to a mentor. They wanted to take a shortcut to spirituality in spite of the commands of G-d and the ways of their fathers. Moshe and Aharon were “in the way” of their aspirations to greatness. Read More

Why do they let him keep speaking in public?

Lehitgayer News

Pat Robertson believes that there is a G-d and a Devil and that they are at war. This concept within Christian cosmology was borrowed from pagan ideas of good vs. evil and Judaism rejects it just as it does any notion that claims there is a power outside of G-d Himself.

In a pathetic attempt at solidarity with the Jews, Robertson declared this past Thursday that Satan is the cause of anti-semitism but “the poor Jews don’t understand that, it’s too cosmic for most of them to grasp, especially because they don’t believe Jesus is the Messiah.” See it for yourself:

 

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One Yud makes all the difference. Just a small letter. The smallest of all Hebrew letters. But if you don’t pay attention to the details you could be following a corrupter instead of waiting for the Messiah.

Look at this picture. Does it look Christian to you? Probably not. There is a sefer Torah on the table, men in kippot and women with their heads covered; but trust me, it couldn’t get more Goyish or more Christian. Jesus (a.k.a. Yeshua) was on everyone’s mind that day. How do I know? I was there! It’s a snapshot of my former life and as embarrassing as it is to admit that I was there I think it’s necessary to reveal so that I can warn others about a lethal threat to Jews today.

While Christians are certainly dangerous to Jews because of their missionary efforts, Messianics are far more so because of how deceptive their lifestyle is. True, an Orthodox, Frum From Birth Jew would be able to tell right away that something was wrong but other Jews may not suspect until it is too late (read counter-missionary Julius Ciss’ riveting story). Messianics, in their lust for Jewish approval and membership, commit acts of great destruction. For example, they often intermarry wreaking havoc on the lives of their children and the Jewish community. They desecrate Jewish ritual objects like Torahs, shofars, mezzuzot and tefillin. The men show up in real Jewish synagogues and pray in the minyan; they feel that they have a right to do this because they believe that they are a part of the “true Israel” because of their belief in Jesus. They hold Pesach seders, go to their churches on Saturdays, and keep some form of kosher (although most of them do not keep Rabbinic kosher because they disdain the Oral Torah).

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If Jesus had a Facebook account would you “unlike” him? With all of the press around Rabbi Boteach’s recent book and the plethora of availability of commentary from both sides, it might be worth considering how much attention Jews and Noahides should “devote” to Jesus. I read that someone on another blog suggested an interesting idea: form a group of ex-messianics for the purpose of writing refutations to Christian proofs. That might be helpful. It certainly is worth exploring but with some caution. Read More

Today I read a mashal (parable) from Rebbe Nachman. He says like this:
Once, an important trader was traveling with a consignment of fine Hungarian wine. During the journey his assistant and the carriage driver said to him, “Here we are, traveling with all this wine. It’s a very hard journey – give us a little taste of the wine.” He agreed to let them have a small taste.

A few days later, the assistant happened to be in a small town with some people who were drinking wine and praising it extravagantly. They said it was Hungarian. “Let me have a taste,” said the assistant. They gave him some, and he said, “This isn’t fine Hungarian wine at all!” They were most offended and told him to leave, but he insisted: “I know very well that this wine isn’t Hungarian, because I was with a wine merchant who had genuine Hungarian wine and he gave me some to try. I know what it really tastes like.” But they ignored him. Read More

“…Messianics are left with nothing but their own self-assertions for the authenticity of their religious identity. While Christians hope for the realization of Jesus as the messiah on the part of the Jewish world so that Jews will become Christians, Messianics hope for the realization of Jesus as an Orthodox Jew by religious Jews so that they themselves will be accepted in the Jewish world.” An excerpt from Yehudah Illan’s blog http://chizzukemunah.com. Click below for more!

Kosher Jesus, Treif Christianity.

via Kosher Jesus, Treif Christianity.

It’s one thing to behave kindly towards people of other religions, especially for a Jew living in galut (exile). It’s quite another to befriend them and engage in “healthy” dialogues in an apologetical way either in public or private debates and conversations.  To do this is perhaps a modesty issue; private matters such as one’s devotion to G-d or how one personally relates to Him within a larger religious group should remain within the social confines of that group. Is it really a Christian’s business what Jews think of Jesus? Rav Soloveitchik wrote the following in a letter to the Rabbinical Council of America in November 1964:

…We are, therefore, opposed to any public debate, dialogue or symposium concerning the doctrinal, dogmatic or ritual aspects of our faith vis a vis “similar” aspects of another faith community. We believe in and are committed to our Maker in a specific manner and we will not question, defend, offer apologies, analyze or rationalize our faith in dialogues centered about these “private” topics which express our personal relationship to the G-d of Israel. We assume that members of other faith communities will feel similarly about their individual religious commitment.

One of the topics Rav Soloveitchik mentioned specifically in his book Community, Covenant and Commitment was the Jewish attitude on Jesus. Read More

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